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komatsu
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To often we admire the fighting man the guy who bravely faces the foe and kills a bunch of them in the process or loses his own life.While they are indeed brave and deserve the title hero tho most of them would deny it there is another kind of hero rarely mentioned in tales of gore glory and war.

This one of them.

You're a 19 year old kid.

You're critically wounded and dying in the jungle somewhere in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam.

It's November 11, 1967.
LZ (landing zone) X-ray.

Your unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 yards away, that your CO (commanding officer) has ordered the MedEvac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.

Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.

As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter.

You look up to see a Huey coming in. But ... It doesn't seem real because no MedEvac markings are on it.

Captain Ed Freeman is coming in for you.

He's not MedEvac so it's not his job, but he heard the radio call and decided he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.

Even after the MedEvacs were ordered not to come. He's coming anyway.

And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 3 of you at a time on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses and safety.

And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!!
Until all the wounded were out. No one knew until the mission was over that the Captain had been hit 4 times in the legs and left arm.

He took 29 of you and your buddies out that day. Some would not have made it without the Captain and his Huey.

Medal of Honor Recipient, Captain Ed Freeman,United States Air Force, died last Wednesday at the age of 70, in Boise, Idaho .

May God Bless and Rest His Soul.

I bet you didn't hear about this hero's passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch about Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods.


komatsu

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common sense is so rarely used it is often mistaken for genius.pay attention at all times do your home work

Posts: 1120 | From: TORONTO GTA ONTARIO CANADA | Registered: Apr 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mike t
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Sadly too right... Thanks for the reminder.

--------------------
Mike T.,
4th Dan Shorin Ryu

Posts: 1228 | From: West Michigan | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bodhi
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Another great hero very few hear about, one of THE most decorated warriors in American History from that very unpopular conflict: http://jcrue.wordpress.com/2010/02/24/colonel-robert-l-howard-a-hero-passes-and-you-will-most-likely-not-hear-a-word-about-it/

So many great men and women of the conflict are dying too young. But even as they fought, they lived their lives after the war in service to noble causes greater than their individual lives. Now that is heroic--to continue serving humanity.

Art

Posts: 572 | From: Wooster, Ohio | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bodhi
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Until his death, Retired Col. Howard served and fought for all veterans rights, from any conflict, regardless of the number of medals received or not--he never gave up the fight for what is right and honorable in being human.

His greatest achievements for us humans and vets came after the horrors of war.

Art

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Traveller
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Two prime examples of the sad fact that "worthy" and "newsworthy" are rarely the same thing.

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The greatest victory is the battle not fought.

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Gary Chamberlain
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What an outstanding example to us all.

I used to live opposite an old Polish couple. Always polite, but they kept themselves to themselves. On occasions I'd move on youngsters who collected outside their house as I knew they went to bed early, and help with the odd DIY job for a mug of tea and home-made Polish cakes.

On helping them move years later he showed me his WW2 stuff, he flew in the Polish section of the RAF and had medal after medal. He'd never even bothered to mention it ...

Gary

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EFFECTIVE always looks good!

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Wallace
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My Father passed away last October 22.

He was a WWII vet, served in the Pacific front with the Navy fighting to free the Philippines (Something my wife and I are both grateful for as she is Filipina).

He was on two ships which were hit and sunk spending five days the first time and two weeks the second time floating in the ocean. Both times he held on to wounded shipmates and kept them afloat while waiting for rescue. After the war, he went home and raised a family.

Shortly before he passed away, he was in a hospital recovering from hip replacement surgery. A nurse came into his room and moved his call cord out of reach because he was calling them in too often. He called 911 and the operator sent the police in to see to it he was taken care of and not mistreated any further.

While I am happy that the operator thought enough to actually send the police, I still, even after his passing, get so angry when I think of this hero, member of what we in America call our "Greatest Generation", forced to call 911 emergency as he could not remember the number to home.

He did all of the little things that made him my hero, but no one ever heard of him. A lot of the times those who are known did not do as much as those who remain unknown.

I do not watch the news much anymore as they seem bent on trying to entertain pople instead of informing them.

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Peace,
Wallace
Hung Gar
www.sifuatlarge.wordpress.com

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5ancestors
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I feel honoured to have read this Komatsu. I would like to share this story with some people I know. It will hit some nails on some heads and change some lives - perhaps. Would this be OK?
Posts: 41 | From: Iver Bucks | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bodhi
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Wallace:

You Dad had enough sense to call 911 and the Dispatcher had enough sense to call the police.

Now if the nursing staff would have had the same sense to do their job correctly, your Dad wouldn't have had to take matters in his own hands. Glad he called and in my opinion, the whole nursing staff floor needed to be fired on that shift for their negligence.

I worked in hospitals for six years as nursing staff in psychiatric units. What that staff did was to endanger a patient who was completely dependent for his needs and their actions violated common compassion and the Hippocratic oath of "First Do No Harm..." along with probably some State Medical Codes.

Sorry you an your Dad had to experience such cold indifference.

And I am with you on the news media...I follow the Afghan/Iraq wars via BBC and my local weather--that's about it. News has digressed into entertainment for the ratings--sad but true.

Art

Posts: 572 | From: Wooster, Ohio | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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